Orlando to host 2024 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials

0

By LetsRun.com
November 8, 2022

Running fans’ long national nightmare is over.

Tuesday, almost four months after the Trials should be rewardedthe USATF announced that Orlando, Florida, will be the host the 2024 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials on February 3, 2024. The top three finishers in the race with the qualifying standard will be selected to the U.S. team for the 2024 Olympic Marathons in Paris, to be held August 10-11, 2024. The race will be produced by Track Shack, a race management company run by Jon and Betsy Hughes which features a number of events in the Orlando area.

The article continues under the player

Like this article ? Subscribe to our newsletter or follow us on social networks

The latest running news, delivered weekly to your inbox or when urgent news arrives.

You are subscribed.

Chattanooga, Tennessee, was the only other city known to be interested in the auction.

Although we now know when and where the tests will take place, there are still a number of things to settle before the race in 452 days. One is the course, which has yet to be announced. Another is Olympic standards, which must also be announced by World Athletics. Although the top three finishers from each of the last five Olympic trials have all made the team, that is not guaranteed this time around as Olympic standards are set to become significantly stricter in 2024.

Qualification standards for the 2024 trials are 63:00/2:18:00 for men and 72:00/2:37:00 for women.

Some thoughts on the Orlando Trials.

Quick take: Thank goodness we finally have a site and a date

The announcement of Orlando as a tryout host came much later than usual. The 2016 essays were awarded in January 2014 and the 2020 essays in April 2018, so for the 2024 essays which will be awarded in November 2022, this is a significant delay. The USATF explained this part is due to potential changes to the 2024 Olympic Qualification System and Olympic Qualification Standards and the uncertainty this could create for a Host City.

It was feared that because of these uncertainties as well as the heavy financial burdens imposed on the local organizing committee, Trials might not happen in 2024 at all – or at least in the way we’re used to seeing them. Fortunately, the USATF has done its best to ensure that the traditional trials are going on and that the The Greater Orlando Sports Commission has applied.

The road to Trials 2024 hasn’t been the smoothest, and Orlando will have less time than a typical Trials host to organize and promote the event. But at least now fans, athletes and coaches all have a date they can mark on the calendar and start planning for it.

One more thing: the USATF did a good job of picking February 3rd. This gives athletes plenty of time to recover before the Olympic marathon in August. And, crucially, the date falls in the bye week between AFC/NFC championship games and the Super Bowl, meaning it won’t compete with America’s biggest sporting event.

Quick take: the course will probably be flat, but we don’t know how hot it will be because we don’t know when the race will be

Unlike 2020, where the Olympic Trials were held on a hilly course before a flat Olympic Marathon, 2024 will likely feature the opposite scenario: a relatively hilly Olympic Marathon but a flat course for the Trials. The course has not yet been announced but Orlando is not known for its hills.

Any American riders hoping to make the Paris Olympic team will probably want to have already reached the Olympic standard (which has yet to be released) before the trials or at least the slower “quota reallocation standard” (explained here) as the temperatures could most likely be warmer – much like they are at the Olympics.

If the goal was to run as fast as possible, the race would start somewhere between 6 and 8 am. But it’s the US Olympic Trials, which means there are television considerations. The final two trials were broadcast nationally by NBC and therefore began much later than a typical big-city marathon. In 2016 trials in Los Angeles, trials began at 10:06 a.m. local time (men) and 10:22 a.m. (women), which is 1:06 p.m. and 1:22 p.m. ET. In 2020 in Atlanta, the Trials started at 12:08 p.m. local time (men) and 12:20 p.m. (women).

The USATF said in its press release that television details will be released at a later date. But if the tryouts are on NBC again (they own the rights), we could see a start closer to noon. This would make it difficult for anyone still looking to achieve a standard as the weather usually becomes a lot warmer afternoon in Orlando in February. The average temperature on February 3 in Orlando over the past 11 years has been 69.6 degrees at noon and 72.5 on arrival.

Below, you’ll see detailed graphs showing you the temperature, wind, and dew point at six different times of day in Orlando on February 3 dating back to 2012, along with projected data for August 11, 2024 (date of the marathon feminine). It should be noted that the average temperature in Orlando on February 3 is very similar to that of August 11 in Paris. At 10 a.m. the temperature is normally in the mid 60s and at 2 p.m. in the low 70s.

All past data and projected data as of August 11, 2024 is from DarkSky.

Temp (F) Feb. 3 in Orlando since 2012

6 a.m. 8am 10am 12 p.m. 2 p.m. 4 p.m.
2022 59 62 72 78 81 81
2021 41 41 45 51 56 59
2020 47 50 62 69 72 73
2019 62 62 64 69 70 72
2018 54 55 61 66 66 65
2017 56 56 69 75 78 79
2016 69 70 76 80 83 83
2015 43 43 52 60 65 66
2014 64 64 73 79 84 85
2013 46 44 59 66 69 70
2012 61 63 68 73 73 73
Avg 54.7 55.5 63.7 69.6 72.5 73.3
Temp
Median temperature 56 56 64 69 72 73
Project. Paris on August 11, 2024s 64 64 66 70 73 74

Wind (mph) on February 3 in Orlando since 2012

6 a.m. 8am 10am 12 p.m. 2 p.m. 4 p.m.
2022 6 seven 11 12 11 ten
2021 13 14 14 14 11 8
2020 1 1 6 4 4 3
2019 1 0 0 9 8 8
2018 5 3 4 8 8 seven
2017 0 0 0 2 6 5
2016 3 4 9 ten 9 8
2015 4 4 seven 4 5 5
2014 0 0 4 6 6 4
2013 3 0 4 8 8 6
2012 0 1 3 9 8 9
Avg. Wind 3.3 3.1 5.6 7.8 7.6 6.6
median wind 3 1 4 8 8 seven
Project. Paris on August 11, 2024 5 6 6 seven 8 8

Dew point (F) on February 3 in Orlando since 2012

6 a.m. 8am 10am 12 p.m. 2 p.m. 4 p.m.
2022 57 59 64 61 61 61
2021 31 30 28 29 22 22
2020 44 47 49 47 45 45
2019 62 62 64 65 65 65
2018 46 47 50 53 53 53
2017 54 55 61 62 60 58
2016 68 69 71 70 69 68
2015 35 37 43 47 49 48
2014 63 63 71 69 66 63
2013 37 41 48 48 48 44
2012 60 61 63 60 59 59
Mean dew point 50.6 51.9 55.6 55.5 54.3 53.3
Median dew point 54 55 61 60 59 59
Project. Paris on August 11, 2024 54 55 55 55 55 55

Quick Take: We still need to know the Olympic standards

World Athletics has yet to announce the standards for the 2024 Olympics, but they should be faster – possibly much faster – than the 2020 Olympics standards (2:11:30/2:29: 30). Marathon standards at the 2023 World Championships are 2:09:40/2:28:00 (times achieved by five American men and 11 American women so far in 2022) and Olympic standards will likely be tougher than that .

Could we see a scenario where someone who finishes in the top 3 in Orlando does not make the team? We need to know more at this point — not just the standards, but how Americans are reacting to their pursuit in 2023 — but it’s certainly possible. World Athletics created a US Trials-oriented loophole that would allow any country with three qualified athletes to substitute any or all of them as long as the replacement ran at least 2:11:30/2:29: 30 during the qualifying window. (For more details on how this all works, we explain it here).

However, anyone hoping to enter with this easier standard better hopes to get it before race day. It was hot at the 2016 Trials in Los Angeles and only one man ran faster than 2:11:30 that day: Galen Rupp won the race in 2:11:13 with Meb Keflezighi second in 2:12:21 and Jared Neighborhood third in 2:13:00. The temperature was 66 degrees at the start of this race; it could be even hotter in Orlando in 2024.

What do you think of the Trials taking place in Orlando? Discuss it on our world famous fan forum/messageboard.

MB: Breaking: Orlando will host the Olympic Marathon Trials on February 3, 2024.


About LetsRun.com: LetsRun.com is the home of professional running. Quoted by media around the world, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, Sports Illustrated, Outside, ABC’s Good Morning America, The Times (London) and The Daily Nation (Kenya). The NY Times described LetsRun as “the influential website that serves as a sort of superego for American running.” If you want to take your fandom to the next level, join the LRC Supporters Club.


Source link

Share.

About Author

Comments are closed.