‘Real life Squid Game’: How sadistic Korean’s family found life in Australia

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Family of convicted felon behind ‘real life squid game’ in South Korea lives in Sydney and fears his property may be seized as compensation for victims of his horrific abuse .

Park In-keun, a former soldier and boxer imprisoned in the mid-1980s after being charged with embezzlement and forcible confinement, was later a regular visitor to Australia, being granted a visa despite his criminal record.

Her brother-in-law is a Presbyterian pastor in Sydney. Her youngest daughter, Park Jee-hee, also lives in Sydney and, along with her husband Alex Min Kyung-woo, owns the Milperra Golf Driving Range and Sports Complex.

The complex, owned by the family business Job’s Town, generates rental income of over $ 400,000 per year. It is on sale for $ 15 million.

Daily Mail Australia is not claiming that family members – including Park Jee-hee, Alex Min Kyung-woo and Lim Young-soon – were involved in Park In-keun’s activities.

Park Jee-hee (pictured right) lives in Sydney and, along with her husband Alex Min Kyung-woo (pictured left), owns the Milperra Golf Driving Range and Sports Complex

The property is being sought as compensation by survivors of the horrific abuses that took place in the Korean port city of Busan decades ago.

Park In-keun ran Brothers Home like a dictatorship, forming platoons in which inmates were forced to compete and abuse others in order to survive.

It has been compared to Squid Game, the hit Netflix series where poor contestants fight to the death in a complex series of cruel games.

In the early 1980s, South Korea, then under military rule, was cleaning the streets of homeless people and other unwanted people before the 1988 Seoul Olympics.

They wanted, according to them, to purify the country in the eyes of visiting Olympic officials and, later, the world watching them.

Under the pretext of providing a social service helping the homeless and the disabled, Brothers Home was a government funded but privately run internment camp.

Officially, 551 people have died at Brothers Home, but the actual number is believed to be much higher. He saw some of the worst human rights violations in South Korea during the 1970s and 1980s.

They took more than the homeless. Only 10 percent of those taken to Brothers Home were actually homeless.

The brothers' house in Busan, South Korea (pictured) has been called a live version of the hit Netflix TV show Squid Game

The brothers’ house in Busan, South Korea (pictured) has been called a live version of the hit Netflix TV show Squid Game

‘[The Brothers Home] was able to increase its government support payments. And in order to be able to embezzle the money, they had to increase the number of people inside the establishment, ”Busan city councilor Park Min-sung told Al Jazeera network. House of horror program.

“So they started ruthlessly kidnapping anyone on the streets, people going about their daily lives.”

Survivor Choi Seung-woo was only 14 when he was taken to the compound, where he claims he was enslaved, raped and brutally beaten for five years.

He was not homeless, he was walking home from school when he was arrested and accused of stealing a piece of bread by a police officer and was sent to the Maison des Frères.

Pastor Lim Young-soon (pictured) came out of Korea and moved to Sydney in 1986

Pastor Lim Young-soon (pictured) came out of Korea and moved to Sydney in 1986

“The mental and physical damage inflicted on me was something I never imagined,” Choi told program directors Mary Ann Jolley and Susan Kim. “Everything I dreamed of has been destroyed. ”

Severely malnourished, the detainees were forced to build the enclosure that housed them and future detainees. It was slave labor.

A former inmate said, “Every night I was sexually assaulted. Another said: ‘I have seen people beaten to death. I was horrified.

At the start of construction, when inmates slept in tents, it was believed that hundreds of people had died, but their deaths were not reported, they were simply buried in the fields.

Former soldier and boxer Park In-keun (pictured left, with his wife) ruled Brothers Home like a dictatorship

Former soldier and boxer Park In-keun (pictured left, with his wife) ruled Brothers Home like a dictatorship

A propaganda film from the time said, “This is where dreams are made. In reality, children were beaten with baseball bats if they did not meet their daily work quota.

Sadistic leaders called the punishments “games.” One of them was “the motor vehicle game” where the torturer would shout “left flag” and then hit them in the eye until he was bruised and red.

The “Hiroshima Game” was one where victims were forced to hang upside down from the rails of their bunk beds for long periods of time. If they fell, they were beaten.

Anyone who tried to escape had to carry a red bag that said, “I am a sinner who has gone against the word of God.

What happened at Brothers Home in Korea has been compared to Korean TV show Squid Game (pictured)

What happened at Brothers Home in Korea has been compared to Korean TV show Squid Game (pictured)

Park In-keun’s brother-in-law, Lim Young-soon, was the pastor of the complex’s church. He left Korea for Sydney in 1986.

He established himself as a cleric in a suburban Korean Christian congregation and reportedly paid over $ 100,000 for a house in 1988.

Repeated attempts were made to elicit comment from Lim.

Treatment of detainees at Brothers Home in Busan, South Korea in the 1980s has implications for Sydney 40 years later

Treatment of detainees at Brothers Home in Busan, South Korea in the 1980s has implications for Sydney 40 years later

Officially, more than 500 people have died at the Brothers Home, but the actual figure is believed to be much higher

Officially, more than 500 people have died at the Brothers Home, but the actual figure is believed to be much higher

In 1987, Park In-keun was charged with embezzlement and forcible confinement. The charge of illegal forcible confinement was dropped and he served only two and a half years in prison for his conviction for embezzlement.

In 1989 he was released from prison and returned to the welfare sector, changing the name from Brothers House to Job’s Village.

Despite his criminal record, Park and his wife obtained visas for Australia and regularly visited their children and in-laws in Sydney.

Children reportedly beaten with baseball bats if they did not meet their daily work quota

Children reportedly beaten with baseball bats if they did not meet their daily work quota

Busan councilor Park Min-sung said records showed Park had sent money to various churches in Australia. “So we suspect that was his way of expanding his relationship there.”

“The allegations are not true,” Park In-keun’s son-in-law Alex Min Kyung-woo told Daily Mail Australia.

“This has been going on for too long. I don’t intend to [doing] any interview.

He added that “I don’t think you (Australian media) know the whole story” and said he would take “legal advice”.

The Brothers Home inmates were subjected to such cruelty that it was called the real squid game

The Brothers Home inmates were subjected to such cruelty that it was called the real squid game

Park In-keun was charged again in 2013, along with his son Park Chun-kwang, for embezzling money from one of the family’s welfare centers in South Korea.

Her son was jailed for three years, but Park’s charges were stayed because he suffered from dementia. He died in 2015.

In November 2018, after years of protests outside the country’s parliament, the victims finally obtained an apology. Then-Attorney General Moon Moo-il said, “The truth behind the abuse has never been fully disclosed, and for the tragic reality that continues to this day, we are deeply sorry.”

Korea's Truth and Reconciliation Commission holds hearings at Brothers Home.  Survivors demand that some Koreans in Australia be brought back for questioning and their assets seized

Korea’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission holds hearings at Brothers Home. Survivors demand that some Koreans in Australia be brought back for questioning and their assets seized

In 2021, Korea’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission began hearing the Brothers Home. Survivors are calling for some Koreans in Australia to be brought back for questioning and their assets to be seized.

Former pastor Lim Young-soon is one of those survivors want to see in Korea again to speak to the commission about what he saw.

Busan advisor Park Min-sung said Milperra’s property must be seized and sold. “This money must be spent on the victims.”


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